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AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

Do not take AUBAGIO if you have severe liver problems, are pregnant or of childbearing potential and not using effective birth control, have had an allergic reaction to AUBAGIO or leflunomide, or are taking a medicine called leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis. View IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION.

For U.S. residents only.

Living Well > Painless camping ideas

Painless camping ideas


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Camping is a favorite summer vacation for so many people. Then there’s the rest of us. Sure, fresh air and nature can be very relaxing, but it can also be a lot of work for some folks. Especially if you have MS.

Walking or hiking to a camp site can be tough if you have mobility issues. When it comes to MS heat sensitivity – dealing with a hot sun or a hot campfire can be too much for some. And is there any place more inconvenient to deal with bladder issues than the middle of the woods?

But just because you’re not a natural-born scout doesn’t mean you have to miss out on camping all together. Making a few adjustments to traditional camp activities can make it more appealing—even for the most urbanized city slickers among us.

The great backyard

If you have younger children or grandchildren who want to camp but don’t understand why it’s hard for you, a backyard camp out could be a nice compromise. They can still experience the magic of lying on their back and staring up at the stars, while you do it from the comfort of a backyard chair. (Plus, the bathroom and your own bed are just a quick walk away.)

S’more treats, less heat

Love s’mores but dread sitting close to open flames? Microwave technology to the rescue. (Assuming you’re doing the backyard camping approach.) Place your bottom cracker on a paper towel, top with marshmallow and chocolate, and zap for about 15 seconds. (Or until the marshmallow puffs.) Take it out, add top cracker and enjoy!

Access the right trails

Did you know many national preserves, recreation areas, and forests have accessible trails for people using wheelchairs or scooters? Even if you move without assistive devices, these trails can be easier to navigate for people with fatigue or mobility issues. The National Park Service website has more details on finding these walks.

If sleeping bags aren’t your bag

If you are going to head out into the Great Outdoors for an overnight, creating a more comfortable sleeping environment should be a top priority. Some thoughts:

  1. Flocked air beds are more comfortable than hard ground. Many are self-inflating, so you don’t waste energy blowing them up with a foot pump, and they tend to be more durable and taller than a traditional air mattress, which can make them easier to get in and out of.
  2. Adjustable cots fit in most tents and can be even more comfortable than air beds for some because they tend to be at a higher height and feel sturdier, making it a little easier to get in and out of.
  3. Cabins and yurts are rentable at many campsites, many of which have cots or real beds already inside. Many cabins and/or campsites also contain bathrooms, taking some of the actual nature out of ‘when nature calls.’ If you like the sound of camping but tent life is a deal breaker, a rented cabin might be a great solution.

Don’t just look at campsites, talk about them

These days, all research starts online. But, once you find a camp spot that interests you, try booking the site over the phone. Talking to a person who works at the facility and sharing with them your needs and concerns may help them set you up with the right spot and may alleviate some nervousness you’re feeling about the trip.

Talk with your HCP to see if they have any additional suggestions on safe ways to enjoy the outdoors for patients with MS.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not take AUBAGIO if you have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, including liver failure that can be life-threatening and may require a liver transplant. View More

INDICATION

AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

DO NOT TAKE AUBAGIO IF YOU:
  • Have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, including liver failure that can be life-threatening and may require a liver transplant. Your risk may be higher if you already have liver problems or take other medicines that affect your liver. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check your liver within 6 months before you start AUBAGIO and monthly for 6 months after starting AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of these symptoms of liver problems: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, tiredness, yellowing of your skin or whites of your eyes, or dark urine.
  • Are pregnant. AUBAGIO may harm an unborn baby. You should have a pregnancy test before starting AUBAGIO. After stopping AUBAGIO, continue to use effective birth control until you have made sure your blood levels of AUBAGIO are lowered. If you become pregnant while taking AUBAGIO or within 2 years after stopping, tell your healthcare provider right away and enroll in the AUBAGIO Pregnancy Registry at 1-800-745-4447, option 2.
  • Are of childbearing potential and not using effective birth control.

    It is not known if AUBAGIO passes into breast milk. Your healthcare provider can help you decide if you should take AUBAGIO or breastfeed — you should not do both at the same time.

    If you are a man whose partner plans to become pregnant, you should stop taking AUBAGIO and talk with your healthcare provider about reducing the levels of AUBAGIO in your blood. If your partner does not plan to become pregnant, use effective birth control while taking AUBAGIO.

  • Have had an allergic reaction to AUBAGIO or a medicine called leflunomide.
  • Take a medicine called leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

AUBAGIO may stay in your blood for up to 2 years after you stop taking it. Your healthcare provider can prescribe a medicine that can remove AUBAGIO from your blood quickly.

Before taking AUBAGIO, talk with your healthcare provider if you have: liver or kidney problems; a fever or infection, or if you are unable to fight infections; numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms; diabetes; serious skin problems when taking other medicines; breathing problems; or high blood pressure. Your healthcare provider will check your blood cell count and TB test before you start AUBAGIO. Talk with your healthcare provider if you take or are planning to take other medicines (especially medicines for treating cancer or controlling your immune system), over-the-counter medicines, vitamins or herbal supplements.

AUBAGIO may cause serious side effects. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • decreases in white blood cell count — this may cause you to have more infections. Symptoms include fever, tiredness, body aches, chills, nausea, or vomiting. Patients with low white blood cell count should not receive certain vaccinations during AUBAGIO treatment and 6 months after.
  • allergic reactions such as difficulty breathing, itching, or swelling on any part of your body including lips, eyes, throat, or tongue. Stop taking AUBAGIO and call your doctor right away.
  • serious skin reactions that may lead to death. Stop taking AUBAGIO if you have rash or redness and peeling, mouth sores or blisters.
  • other allergic reactions that may affect different parts of the body. If you have a fever or rash in combination with severe muscle pain, swollen lymph glands, swelling of your face, unusual bruising or bleeding, weakness or tiredness, or yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes, stop taking AUBAGIO and call your doctor right away.
  • numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms
  • high blood pressure
  • breathing problems (new or worsening) — these may be serious and lead to death

The most common side effects when taking AUBAGIO include: headache; diarrhea; nausea; hair thinning or loss; and abnormal liver test results. These are not all the side effects of AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you.

Consult your healthcare provider if you have questions about your health or any medications you may be taking, including AUBAGIO.

Please click here for full Prescribing Information, including boxed WARNING and Medication Guide.