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AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

Do not take AUBAGIO if you have severe liver problems, are pregnant or of childbearing potential and not using effective birth control, have had an allergic reaction to AUBAGIO or leflunomide, or are taking a medicine called leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis. View IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION.

For U.S. residents only.

Living Well > Finding your voice: Tips for talking with your doctor

Finding your voice: Tips for talking with your doctor


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There are so many pressures that constrain today’s healthcare appointment. Doctors have many patients to see during the day, so there are limits on the amount of time they spend with each patient. Your doctor’s office may use a team approach to managing your health, so you don’t always see the same person for a visit. Plus, during the pandemic, many routine care visits have moved to telehealth. These are just a few reasons why good communication is really important to helping you get the care you need.

Like any good skill, good communication takes practice. Let’s review just a few of the best practices you can put into use to get the most from your healthcare appointments.

The I not You rule.

This is a great guiding rule. If you aren’t following something your healthcare provider is saying, simply say “I don’t understand” or “I wonder if you can explain that differently.” This lets your provider know that while they may be making perfect sense in their world, they aren’t connecting with yours.

The “I not You” rule also helps shift the tone. “You aren’t being clear” feels like a reprimand where “I don’t understand” gets you to the same place without blame.

Mirror, Mirror.

If the “I don’t understand” rule isn’t quite working for you to get something explained, try the “mirror, mirror” approach. That means you mirror what the healthcare provider says in your own words. That way, your provider gets to hear how you’ve interpreted their words so that you come to a mutual understanding. It can start like this. “OK, let me say this back to you to make sure I’ve got it right.” Or “This is what I’m hearing.”

Keep calm and stay assertive.

Sometimes, providers make recommendations or decisions that may not work for you. It’s ok to speak up and educate them. Maybe they don’t think you need to see a specialist for a particular symptom, but it’s really bothering you. Tell them that you’d love to just get a baseline evaluation to put you more at ease. Or maybe you are feeling rushed at the office and you just need to ask them to slow down to explain things a little more thoroughly.

Here's one other pointer. If your doctor has any questions about your continued access to AUBAGIO, here’s a tip. Call MS One to One! (Read more about this topic now.)

Sometimes, people don’t want to challenge a doctor’s decision but often times, when a doctor understands your perspective, they are better able to make decisions that are right for you.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not take AUBAGIO if you have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, including liver failure that can be life-threatening and may require a liver transplant. View More

INDICATION

AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

DO NOT TAKE AUBAGIO IF YOU:
  • Have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, including liver failure that can be life-threatening and may require a liver transplant. Your risk may be higher if you already have liver problems or take other medicines that affect your liver. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check your liver within 6 months before you start AUBAGIO and monthly for 6 months after starting AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of these symptoms of liver problems: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, tiredness, yellowing of your skin or whites of your eyes, or dark urine.
  • Are pregnant. AUBAGIO may harm an unborn baby. You should have a pregnancy test before starting AUBAGIO. After stopping AUBAGIO, continue to use effective birth control until you have made sure your blood levels of AUBAGIO are lowered. If you become pregnant while taking AUBAGIO or within 2 years after stopping, tell your healthcare provider right away and enroll in the AUBAGIO Pregnancy Registry at 1-800-745-4447, option 2.
  • Are of childbearing potential and not using effective birth control.

    It is not known if AUBAGIO passes into breast milk. Your healthcare provider can help you decide if you should take AUBAGIO or breastfeed — you should not do both at the same time.

    If you are a man whose partner plans to become pregnant, you should stop taking AUBAGIO and talk with your healthcare provider about reducing the levels of AUBAGIO in your blood. If your partner does not plan to become pregnant, use effective birth control while taking AUBAGIO.

  • Have had an allergic reaction to AUBAGIO or a medicine called leflunomide.
  • Take a medicine called leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

AUBAGIO may stay in your blood for up to 2 years after you stop taking it. Your healthcare provider can prescribe a medicine that can remove AUBAGIO from your blood quickly.

Before taking AUBAGIO, talk with your healthcare provider if you have: liver or kidney problems; a fever or infection, or if you are unable to fight infections; numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms; diabetes; serious skin problems when taking other medicines; breathing problems; or high blood pressure. Your healthcare provider will check your blood cell count and TB test before you start AUBAGIO. Talk with your healthcare provider if you take or are planning to take other medicines (especially medicines for treating cancer or controlling your immune system), over-the-counter medicines, vitamins or herbal supplements.

AUBAGIO may cause serious side effects. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • decreases in white blood cell count — this may cause you to have more infections. Symptoms include fever, tiredness, body aches, chills, nausea, or vomiting. Patients with low white blood cell count should not receive certain vaccinations during AUBAGIO treatment and 6 months after.
  • allergic reactions such as difficulty breathing, itching, or swelling on any part of your body including lips, eyes, throat, or tongue. Stop taking AUBAGIO and call your doctor right away.
  • serious skin reactions that may lead to death. Stop taking AUBAGIO if you have rash or redness and peeling, mouth sores or blisters.
  • other allergic reactions that may affect different parts of the body. If you have a fever or rash in combination with severe muscle pain, swollen lymph glands, swelling of your face, unusual bruising or bleeding, weakness or tiredness, or yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes, stop taking AUBAGIO and call your doctor right away.
  • numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms
  • high blood pressure
  • breathing problems (new or worsening) — these may be serious and lead to death

The most common side effects when taking AUBAGIO include: headache; diarrhea; nausea; hair thinning or loss; and abnormal liver test results. These are not all the side effects of AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you.

Consult your healthcare provider if you have questions about your health or any medications you may be taking, including AUBAGIO.

Please click here for full Prescribing Information, including boxed WARNING and Medication Guide.