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AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

Do not take AUBAGIO if you have severe liver problems, are pregnant or of childbearing potential and not using effective birth control, have had an allergic reaction to AUBAGIO or leflunomide, or are taking a medicine called leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis. View IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION.

For U.S. residents only.

AUBAGIO & You > Helpful tips for taking medication

Helpful tips for taking medication


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There are many personal factors that can make taking medication as prescribed a complex behavior. There’s not an easy, one-size-fits-all solution that makes taking medication as prescribed an easy and consistent habit, but here are some tips that may help.

As you settle into a new medication routine with AUBAGIO, here are a few tips to consider that may help you stay on track.

Flex some memory muscle

Marry your medication to a daily activity. Try taking your medication while doing an everyday activity, like making coffee or brushing your teeth. By incorporating this new task into a more established routine, it’s more likely to become second nature to you.

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Download some digital reminders

Most of us have our phones or other devices within earshot at all times. Why not use their built-in alarm feature as a medication reminder? Similarly, most of these devices come equipped with digital calendars that can help you organize your day, right down to the minute. Take some time to get to know your phone’s calendar, then program it to remind you when it’s time for your pill.

Location, location, location

As with many aspects of our lives, medication routines can be hampered by “out of sight, out of mind” scenarios. Keeping your medication in a prominent, easy-to-see area that you pass by often is a good way to jog your memory. Or, if you prefer to keep your medication in a more private location, you can place a visual reminder, like a refrigerator magnet, specific picture or photograph, or any other household item you might associate with AUBAGIO in a more prominent area. This provides a visual reminder, while keeping your medication out of sight.

Call for backup

If you’re concerned you might not be able to remember your medication on your own, ask a friend or family member to help you with reminder phone calls or text messages. Not only will this help you stay on top of your medication routine, it may strengthen your social support relationships, which is also important for your well-being.

Study up on side effects

Some people will be so worried about a medication’s side effects that they’ll forgo taking it all together. But this can be shortsighted for a few reasons:

Everyone reacts to medication differently, including how and if you experience possible side effects. The best course of action is to take the drug as prescribed by your healthcare team and monitor what happens. If you experience side effects, discuss them with your physician. He or she can help you understand what you may expect. Some side effects can lessen over time; while your doctor may have tips to help with other side effects.

It’s also important to remember that you shouldn’t let the past dictate your future.

If you’ve had a challenging experience with one relapsing MS treatment, it doesn’t mean you’ll have that same reaction to a different relapsing MS treatment. Many medications are unique in how they work and affect your body, and different people can react differently to the same medication. If you’re apprehensive about a new therapy because of side effects you’ve previously experienced with other medications, talk it over with your doctor. He or she can discuss the differences in medications to help you make an informed decision about the best next steps.

Insurance assurance

Navigating your medical insurance can be tricky. Between all the forms, different coverage types, and the ever-changing landscape of what’s available, the medical insurance process can feel overwhelming for many. In fact, some get so frustrated by their insurance—or lack of it—that they give up on their medication all together.

But it doesn’t need to be this way.

MS One to One has trained professionals who know the ins and outs of every major insurance type and can help you with any questions or concerns you may have about your insurance coverage for AUBAGIO. If you’re unsure about your own medical insurance coverage, are worried you may not be able to afford AUBAGIO, or you have other insurance-related questions, MS One to One can help. Call 1-855-676-6326.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not take AUBAGIO if you have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, including liver failure that can be life-threatening and may require a liver transplant. View More

INDICATION

AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

DO NOT TAKE AUBAGIO IF YOU:
  • Have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, including liver failure that can be life-threatening and may require a liver transplant. Your risk may be higher if you already have liver problems or take other medicines that affect your liver. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check your liver within 6 months before you start AUBAGIO and monthly for 6 months after starting AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of these symptoms of liver problems: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, tiredness, yellowing of your skin or whites of your eyes, or dark urine.
  • Are pregnant. AUBAGIO may harm an unborn baby. You should have a pregnancy test before starting AUBAGIO. After stopping AUBAGIO, continue to use effective birth control until you have made sure your blood levels of AUBAGIO are lowered. If you become pregnant while taking AUBAGIO or within 2 years after stopping, tell your healthcare provider right away and enroll in the AUBAGIO Pregnancy Registry at 1-800-745-4447, option 2.
  • Are of childbearing potential and not using effective birth control.

    It is not known if AUBAGIO passes into breast milk. Your healthcare provider can help you decide if you should take AUBAGIO or breastfeed — you should not do both at the same time.

    If you are a man whose partner plans to become pregnant, you should stop taking AUBAGIO and talk with your healthcare provider about reducing the levels of AUBAGIO in your blood. If your partner does not plan to become pregnant, use effective birth control while taking AUBAGIO.

  • Have had an allergic reaction to AUBAGIO or a medicine called leflunomide.
  • Take a medicine called leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

AUBAGIO may stay in your blood for up to 2 years after you stop taking it. Your healthcare provider can prescribe a medicine that can remove AUBAGIO from your blood quickly.

Before taking AUBAGIO, talk with your healthcare provider if you have: liver or kidney problems; a fever or infection, or if you are unable to fight infections; numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms; diabetes; serious skin problems when taking other medicines; breathing problems; or high blood pressure. Your healthcare provider will check your blood cell count and TB test before you start AUBAGIO. Talk with your healthcare provider if you take or are planning to take other medicines (especially medicines for treating cancer or controlling your immune system), over-the-counter medicines, vitamins or herbal supplements.

AUBAGIO may cause serious side effects. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • decreases in white blood cell count — this may cause you to have more infections. Symptoms include fever, tiredness, body aches, chills, nausea, or vomiting. Patients with low white blood cell count should not receive certain vaccinations during AUBAGIO treatment and 6 months after.
  • allergic reactions such as difficulty breathing, itching, or swelling on any part of your body including lips, eyes, throat, or tongue. Stop taking AUBAGIO and call your doctor right away.
  • serious skin reactions that may lead to death. Stop taking AUBAGIO if you have rash or redness and peeling, mouth sores or blisters.
  • other allergic reactions that may affect different parts of the body. If you have a fever or rash in combination with severe muscle pain, swollen lymph glands, swelling of your face, unusual bruising or bleeding, weakness or tiredness, or yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes, stop taking AUBAGIO and call your doctor right away.
  • numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms
  • high blood pressure
  • breathing problems (new or worsening) — these may be serious and lead to death

The most common side effects when taking AUBAGIO include: headache; diarrhea; nausea; hair thinning or loss; and abnormal liver test results. These are not all the side effects of AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you.

Consult your healthcare provider if you have questions about your health or any medications you may be taking, including AUBAGIO.

Please click here for full Prescribing Information, including boxed WARNING and Medication Guide.