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AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

Do not take AUBAGIO if you have severe liver problems, are pregnant or of childbearing potential and not using effective birth control, have had an allergic reaction to AUBAGIO or leflunomide, or are taking a medicine called leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis. View IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION.

For U.S. residents only.

Living Well > Wanderlust versus the pandemic

Wanderlust versus the pandemic


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For those who love to travel, the COVID-19 pandemic has surely caused some bumps in the proverbial road.

When you live with MS, you may already plan travel more thoroughly than many who don’t have additional considerations such as “how much medication to pack” or “will there be air conditioning?”

When it comes to traveling during the COVID pandemic, here are some helpful guidelines and some great ideas to wanderlust away from big crowds.

This is not a complete list and you should always check with your doctor for considerations tailored to your individual situation.

Helpful travel info

Your vaccination status may impact your travel. It’s important to research all local requirements, restrictions and situations for your destination; and understand policies and procedures when traveling by air or transport options. See the CDC guidance on traveling during COVID-19.

To help you get ready for travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, here are a few tips that can help. In addition to packing all your travel essentials; it’s recommended that you also pack some supplies such as:

  • face masks – the CDC offers mask guidance on their website to help you learn more about what types of masks are appropriate and under what conditions
  • alcohol-based hand sanitizer (at least 60% alcohol)
  • disinfectant wipes (at least 70% alcohol) for surfaces
  • thermometer

Like other medical decisions, the decision to get a vaccine is best made in partnership with your healthcare provider. The National MS Society also provides COVID-19 vaccine guidance for people living with MS. You can review the guidance and discuss with your doctor if you have any questions about what’s right for you.

Can you plan around the unexpected?

One way to limit COVID-19 exposure is avoid big crowds indoors. So now’s a great time to wander “off the beaten path.” Here are a few suggestions to help you literally think outside the box. And remember that many attractions—whether indoors or outside—are taking reservations during the pandemic to limit crowd size. So do your research and reserve early to ensure your spot!

Want to see some great art? Consider visiting an outdoor sculpture park or art installation. These are often great ways to experience art without close indoor contact. You can also research accessible options for viewing, such as wheelchair accessible paths.

Daytime a little too warm for a stroll? Zoos today are getting very creative with special nighttime exhibits. They may have special nocturnal animal viewings, but even more so, many offer great temporary exhibits involving specialized art or performances (such as artist-carved pumpkins in the fall, or Chinese lantern exhibits designed for nightime viewing).

Looking to take in some history? There are many unique ways to explore local history. Look for local walking tours that provide accessibility options. There are tours designed to taste local cuisines, explore local architecture, or if you like a bit of local lore, look for ghost tours and the like. These are usually a fun and whimsical way to learn about local history. You can also explore a historical site dedicated to sharing indigenous peoples, cultures and trades crafts, or viewing re-enactments of local historical events.

Ready to be entertained? Outdoor amphitheaters offer a great range of performances that include music, theater and comedy. Many outdoor performance areas allow you to bring in your own food and beverages for a great picnic under the stars…and while experiencing some great entertainment.

Just need a change of scenery? Today, many unique vacation rentals are a great option versus staying in a hotel. It can be a house, loft, cabin, or even RV. These unique options often have fully functioning kitchens, so bonus! You may be able to avoid eating at restaurants for every meal as well. But as the saying goes, buyer beware. Do your research, make sure you’re dealing with a reputable renter or firm, read up-to-date customer reviews (lots of them), and make sure there are no surprises like a five-story walkup you weren’t expecting!

The COVID-19 pandemic has definitely uprooted pleasure travel. But with a little knowledge, planning, and the desire to seek experiences off the beaten path, you might just learn to love the wanderlust again.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not take AUBAGIO if you have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, including liver failure that can be life-threatening and may require a liver transplant. View More

INDICATION

AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

DO NOT TAKE AUBAGIO IF YOU:
  • Have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, including liver failure that can be life-threatening and may require a liver transplant. Your risk may be higher if you already have liver problems or take other medicines that affect your liver. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check your liver within 6 months before you start AUBAGIO and monthly for 6 months after starting AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of these symptoms of liver problems: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, tiredness, yellowing of your skin or whites of your eyes, or dark urine.
  • Are pregnant. AUBAGIO may harm an unborn baby. You should have a pregnancy test before starting AUBAGIO. After stopping AUBAGIO, continue to use effective birth control until you have made sure your blood levels of AUBAGIO are lowered. If you become pregnant while taking AUBAGIO or within 2 years after stopping, tell your healthcare provider right away and enroll in the AUBAGIO Pregnancy Registry at 1-800-745-4447, option 2.
  • Are of childbearing potential and not using effective birth control.

    It is not known if AUBAGIO passes into breast milk. Your healthcare provider can help you decide if you should take AUBAGIO or breastfeed — you should not do both at the same time.

    If you are a man whose partner plans to become pregnant, you should stop taking AUBAGIO and talk with your healthcare provider about reducing the levels of AUBAGIO in your blood. If your partner does not plan to become pregnant, use effective birth control while taking AUBAGIO.

  • Have had an allergic reaction to AUBAGIO or a medicine called leflunomide.
  • Take a medicine called leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

AUBAGIO may stay in your blood for up to 2 years after you stop taking it. Your healthcare provider can prescribe a medicine that can remove AUBAGIO from your blood quickly.

Before taking AUBAGIO, talk with your healthcare provider if you have: liver or kidney problems; a fever or infection, or if you are unable to fight infections; numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms; diabetes; serious skin problems when taking other medicines; breathing problems; or high blood pressure. Your healthcare provider will check your blood cell count and TB test before you start AUBAGIO. Talk with your healthcare provider if you take or are planning to take other medicines (especially medicines for treating cancer or controlling your immune system), over-the-counter medicines, vitamins or herbal supplements.

AUBAGIO may cause serious side effects. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • decreases in white blood cell count — this may cause you to have more infections. Symptoms include fever, tiredness, body aches, chills, nausea, or vomiting. Patients with low white blood cell count should not receive certain vaccinations during AUBAGIO treatment and 6 months after.
  • allergic reactions such as difficulty breathing, itching, or swelling on any part of your body including lips, eyes, throat, or tongue. Stop taking AUBAGIO and call your doctor right away.
  • serious skin reactions that may lead to death. Stop taking AUBAGIO if you have rash or redness and peeling, mouth sores or blisters.
  • other allergic reactions that may affect different parts of the body. If you have a fever or rash in combination with severe muscle pain, swollen lymph glands, swelling of your face, unusual bruising or bleeding, weakness or tiredness, or yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes, stop taking AUBAGIO and call your doctor right away.
  • numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms
  • high blood pressure
  • breathing problems (new or worsening) — these may be serious and lead to death

The most common side effects when taking AUBAGIO include: headache; diarrhea; nausea; hair thinning or loss; and abnormal liver test results. These are not all the side effects of AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you.

Consult your healthcare provider if you have questions about your health or any medications you may be taking, including AUBAGIO.

Please click here for full Prescribing Information, including boxed WARNING and Medication Guide.